An Odd Hopelessness

louisnormal:

litttlegremlin:

vincentvillella:

As an art student, you’re hit over the head repeatedly with Renaissance art, so I’ve gotten a little tired of it, but something I’m not tired of is the seemingly impossible naturalistic detail attained from stone and a chisel back then.

^

CAN WE TALK ABOUT BAROQUE SCULPTURE?

this shit is marble. The thing about marble, is that it has a low tensile strength - basically, it snaps easy. And y’know what, this sculptor, Bernini, got so fuckin good at marble sculpting, he made this. Look at the leaves - they are so thin, light shines through them - and he carved each and every one of those little fuckers, without any mistakes. And look at the drapery on the dude: the amount of negative space between him and the veil. Holy fuckin shit balls on a salmon this is good. Look at her luscious, voluminous hair, flowing in the wind. He even carved the eyes with irises.

seriously this dude is the bomb

(Source: vasilisablue, via shootcocacola9)

iwishforapinkpony:

I know a lot of y’all are writers, so I’m sharing the writing tips my English teacher gave me. These are some color symbols.

iwishforapinkpony:

I know a lot of y’all are writers, so I’m sharing the writing tips my English teacher gave me.
These are some color symbols.

(via writeworld)

ignissannat:

Mermaid and Sea-maid from Arthur Spiderwick’s Field Guide to the Fantastical World

Other creatures from this book - here

(via fearlessfeline)

gallopingtormaunt:

breastmilkontherocks:

"Children are required to be in school, where their freedom is greatly restricted, far more than most adults would tolerate in their workplaces. In recent decades we’ve been compelling them to spend ever more time in this kind of setting, and there’s strong evidence that this is causing psychological damage to many of them. And as scientists have investigated how children naturally learn, they’ve realized that kids do so most deeply and fully, and with greatest enthusiasm, in conditions that are almost opposite to those of school….Most people assume that the basic design of today’s schools emerged from scientific evidence about how children learn. But nothing could be further from the truth. Schools as we know them today are a product of history, not research.   …. Research has shown that people of all ages learn best when they are self-motivated, pursuing answers to questions that reflect their personal interests and achieving goals that they’ve set for themselves. Under such conditions, learning is usually joyful. The evidence for all of this is obvious to anyone who’s watched a child grow from infancy to school age. Through their own efforts, children figure out how to walk, run, jump, and climb. They learn from scratch their native language, and with that, they learn to assert their will, argue, amuse, annoy, befriend, charm, and ask questions.  ….
They do all of this before anyone, in any systematic way, tries to teach them anything. This amazing drive and capacity to learn does not turn itself off when children reach five or six. But we turn it off with our coercive system of schooling.”

Thank

gallopingtormaunt:

breastmilkontherocks:

"Children are required to be in school, where their freedom is greatly restricted, far more than most adults would tolerate in their workplaces. In recent decades we’ve been compelling them to spend ever more time in this kind of setting, and there’s strong evidence that this is causing psychological damage to many of them. And as scientists have investigated how children naturally learn, they’ve realized that kids do so most deeply and fully, and with greatest enthusiasm, in conditions that are almost opposite to those of school….
Most people assume that the basic design of today’s schools emerged from scientific evidence about how children learn. But nothing could be further from the truth.
Schools as we know them today are a product of history, not research.

….
Research has shown that people of all ages learn best when they are self-motivated, pursuing answers to questions that reflect their personal interests and achieving goals that they’ve set for themselves. Under such conditions, learning is usually joyful.
The evidence for all of this is obvious to anyone who’s watched a child grow from infancy to school age. Through their own efforts, children figure out how to walk, run, jump, and climb. They learn from scratch their native language, and with that, they learn to assert their will, argue, amuse, annoy, befriend, charm, and ask questions.
….

They do all of this before anyone, in any systematic way, tries to teach them anything.
This amazing drive and capacity to learn does not turn itself off when children reach five or six. But we turn it off with our coercive system of schooling.”

Thank

(via copingwiththemadnesswithin)